Sweet 'Tater Pie

Arrangement related sound file(s): 

This tune was first recorded by the Afro-Cuban Latin jazz percussionist Mongo Santamaria.

Status: 
Active
Source: 

Grant Rodgers, arr. Martin Wallace

Original Song: 
Notes: 

A section played twice, then soloed over as often as desired.
B section played twice.
A section twice and finish.
Trombone limbo line during solo section should run parallel to the band so the public doesn't limbo into the band.

Solo Notes:
Each solo lasts the duration of the A section (i.e., 12 bars).

E-flat Instruments:
This is the same key as Pharaohs, a C Major scale with the "home note" on D:

D E F G A B C
There's more going on than this, though, because Sweet Tater is the only tune where we solo over chord changes.
Listen to the bass line to hear the chords change.
They go in this order: D for several bars, then G for a couple of bars, then D for a couple more bars.
Then A briefly, then G briefly, then D for a couple more bars.
To practice, try playing the the home note over each chord; it will help you to feel the chords.

C Instruments:
This is the same key as Pharaohs, an E♭ Major scale with the "home note" on F:

F G A♭ B♭ C D E♭
There's more going on than this, though, because Sweet Tater is the only tune where we solo over chord changes.
Listen to the bass line to hear the chords change.
They go in this order: F for several bars, then B♭ for a couple of bars, then F for a couple more bars.
Then C briefly, then B♭ briefly, then F for a couple more bars.
To practice, try playing the the home note over each chord; it will help you to feel the chords.

B-flat instruments:
This is the same key as Pharaohs, a F Major scale with the "home note" on G:

G A B♭ C D E F
There's more going on than this, though, because Sweet Tater is the only tune where we solo over chord changes.
Listen to the bass line to hear the chords change.
They go in this order: G for several bars, then C for a couple of bars, then G for a couple more bars.
Then D briefly, then C briefly, then G for a couple more bars.
To practice, try playing the the home note over each chord; it will help you to feel the chords.